Learn What You Can Do With a Psychology Degree

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Acceptance Rates for Graduate school

Sunday, March 13th, 2011

Going to graduate school is not easy. You are required to have a high grade point average, GRE scores, experience, letters of recommendation and statement of intent. Even having these it is important to know the odds.

 

PhD programs have lower odds of acceptance. For instance in class of 5-10 they will accept 4-12% of those who applied. Here is a statistic taken out Professor Callaghan’s Clinical Psychology lecture notes at San Jose State University.

 

Private schools:

  • 7511 applied
  • 873 accepted
  • 12% acceptance rate

 

Public schools:

  • 15198 applied
  • 1033 accepted
  • 6% acceptance rate

 

Note: Schools must be accredited by the American Psychological Association

 

Masters programs are easier to get in than PhD programs since there are so many of them available. They have less competition accept 25-50% from those that apply.

 

If you still want to get into PhD program but realize it will by difficult you can always get into a masters program first then go for a PhD. That is a route many people have taken. Never give up on your dreams but know the odds.

6 Things a Psychology Major needs when applying for Graduate School

Monday, August 30th, 2010

The decision on attending graduate school rests solely on you. In order to first get in you need about six things done on your check list. The checklist is dependent on what school you want to go to. Since some schools may not require a GRE score you may need to check their program requirements. Make sure to do research and email professors with your questions. Usually these are the six things which most graduate schools ask for:

  • A grade point average of 3.0 or higher. This depends on what program you are trying to enter. Some schools want students with 3.5s and will still have low acceptance rates in PhD programs.
  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE) and a score which the college allows for entrance
  • Three to four recommendation letters from professors or anything which will have weight and value when determining your acceptance into graduate school. For instance if you have experience in the Behavior Center it would be wise to have a recommendation letter detailing the hours you were there and the tasks which you did.
  • Experience in the field you are interested in such as an internship or volunteer work
  • A statement of intent is required to detail why you desire to further your education and comments about fluctuations in earlier academic years. For instance, someone close to you may have passed away which caused a strain on your education. Its important to detail this since graduate schools will get to know you in this statement.
  • Lastly you need your undergrad transcript signed by your school to make the document official

Transitioning from Undergraduate school to finding a Career or to Graduate school?

Tuesday, July 6th, 2010

The decision to attend graduate depends on your desire for advanced training. If you do not desire to go that is alright since there are jobs you can get just with a bachelors in psychology. Some of the jobs out there are:

This list is provided by http://psych.hanover.edu/handbook/bachpsy2.html.

 


1. Community Relations Officer: works either for business or government in promoting good relations with the local community.
2. Affirmative Action Officer: works for recruitment and equal opportunities for minorities; employed by business, industries, schools and government.
3. Recreation Worker: plans and supervises community recreation facilities. (Increasing number of opportunities available for therapeutic recreation workers, often requiring course work in therapeutic recreation.)
4. Urban Planning Officer: deals with city planning, renewal.
5. Personnel Administrator: works with employee relations, selection, promotions, etc.
6. Advertising copywriter: researches audience and media, writes text of advertisements.
7. Media Buyer: researches product and audiences to select most effective media for advertising.
8. Health Educator: gives public information about health and disease.
9. Vocational Rehabilitation: counsels persons with handicaps and illnesses in preparation for new vocations (some states require an M.A. degree for this position).
10. Psychiatric Technician/Assistant: administers routine tests, helps with patients under supervision of psychiatrist.
11. Director of Volunteer Service: responsible for volunteers-recruits, supervises, trains, and evaluates volunteers.
12. Public Statistician: collects and interprets data on health and disease and community relations.
13. Customs Inspector: serves at international borders and airports in investigations and inquiries.
14. Probation and Parole Officer: persons with psychology backgrounds are often preferred for such positions, especially with adolescent parolees.
15. Newspaper Reporter: social science, psychological interest areas.
16. Technical Writer: researches and writes material dealing with social science and psychological knowledge for magazines, newspapers and journals.
17. Sales Representative: major publishers of psychological books often seek out undergraduates with psychology majors for these positions on college campuses.
18. Opinion Survey Researcher: does opinion polls and interprets results.
19. Daycare Center Supervisor: supervises and coordinates activities of preschool children with working parents.
20. Research Assistant: assists in the collection and analysis of data for major investigations. Positions usually available only in large hospitals, businesses, and government.
21. Laboratory Assistant: psychology background preferred for students working with animal behavior research, especially primate laboratories.
22. Scientific Instrument Salesperson: opportunities in sales and development for companies specializing in psychology apparatus.

(To know how much each of these careers make annually simply visit www.bls.com and type in the job title)

Are you returning to school? Perhaps it’s been a year or a couple years. When you decide to return you need to renew you old network from university/college. You can also try going back and taking a few classes to meet professors. In order to go to graduate school you may need recommendation letters. Having professors that can recommend you for graduate school has value when the board of admissions is looking at your file. In your statement of intent you can address your many years away from school and why you desired to return. When writing your paper you can detail the many experiences you’ve gone through and what you have learned from them. For instance, if you took care of an elder family member you can say the experience taught you about time management. When returning to school also consider if you need to take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

How will you pay for school?

Monday, June 21st, 2010

There are a few ways to get your self through college. One is by applying for loans. These loans will pay for all your university/college expenses. The only issue with loans is that many of them have high interest levels. They will also only give you a few months to start paying once you graduate. Many people have taken this route and are slowing paying their loans with payment plans. Another option is working and going to school. This option is harder but can be done with effective time management. Expect to be studying longer than the average 4 years it takes for a bachelors. It takes two years for a masters and three more for a PH.d. If you jump from bachelors to Ph.d program it will take 5-7 years of school. The last years will be all internships and accumulating hours before your set loose to work.

A great site to use in the United States for Federal Student Aid: www.fafsa.ed.gov.

 

This site will help you fill in tax and lifestyle information which will then access if you can receive free money from the government. If you’re an independent student who does not live with parents your more likely to get federal funding as opposed to living at home. If your parents make more than 100k then you will be unable to get free money. Your school may also require you to fill in the FAFSA application. So take a look at that link.

Funding Options

Paying for school is a very expensive investment. State schools in America cost 10-15k every year while private schools can go up to 20-30k a year. Internationally school may be cheaper. Do research so you can see the exact costs! You can also try looking into your school and see if they provide funding. Some schools will pay you to study. All you need to do is fill a prerequisite such as a grade point average or enter a program specific to your area of study.

You can also take the free money route and apply for scholarships/grants. Your acceptance to these awards are dependent on the their guideline. For more information on scholarships please sign up to our email list or visit the website www.fastweb.com