Learn What You Can Do With a Psychology Degree

Posts Tagged ‘school of mines’

What to expect in Graduate school?

Sunday, March 13th, 2011

Expect to have a heavy work load. It depends on your program but usually you will have 4 classes a semester with a class time of 12 hours. There will be a lot of researching, writing, and reading. It will be like your undergrad but at a faster pace with more work. Most of your time will be spent learning and working under a professor who will oversee your training.

 

Graduate school is a very big commitment of money and time. A master program will take about 2 years to complete while a PhD program will usually take 4-6 years. You must truly by motivated and desire to further your education in what ever area you study. If you go to graduate school because of a parental figure or because of the money your motivation will be limited. Further your education because you really want to. If you enjoy doing what you’re interested in then work becomes rewarding and not something you have to do but something you chose to do.

Getting a Job after your Undergrad or after Grad school

Sunday, March 13th, 2011

The job market is constantly changing. No longer does an individual work for a company for 30 plus years and then retire and collect checks in the mail. Yes there are exceptions to every rule but in these current times companies will higher a younger person who can do more work and take more stress. They may even outsource their work to employees in a third world country so it can be done for cheaper.

Don’t expect to get your dream job right out of college. You may have to work on the side and apply numerous times before you land that job. Networking and an internship are powerful tools to land the position you want as well as the career center on campus. Check on campus-recruiting and career fairs. If you work within a company and a spot job that needs to be created try selling the idea to the company. You may have success in filling that position. Continue your search and remember there will be tough times but accept the struggle. Preserve and keep trying!

A great site we recommend when searching for jobs is www.monster.com and www.careerbuilder.com

According to the National Association of College and Employers look for about 6 things:

• What school you have attended
• Any volunteer work
• Any leadership positions you took
• What is your major?
• A High GPA (3.0 or above)
• Has been involved in extracurricular activities

The information listed above can be found here: http://www.naceweb.org/Publications/Spotlight_Online/2010/0106/Job_Outlook__What_do_employers_look_for_in_candidates_.aspx

It’s also important to have basic skills such as motivation, computer skills, a logical mindset, and working well with a team. After college you will be more familiar with skills since many of your classes will ask you to learn or practice these skills.

Getting a career/job is numbers game. You will apply to 15 and less than half will call you back. Out of those numbers you will be set with interviews. Some will have more than one interview. You will dress formally and be there for the interview ahead of time. Show up to the interview with your resume and confident self. So start looking for jobs and calling already! Your future is waiting!

Transitioning from Undergraduate school to finding a Career or to Graduate school?

Tuesday, July 6th, 2010

The decision to attend graduate depends on your desire for advanced training. If you do not desire to go that is alright since there are jobs you can get just with a bachelors in psychology. Some of the jobs out there are:

This list is provided by http://psych.hanover.edu/handbook/bachpsy2.html.

 


1. Community Relations Officer: works either for business or government in promoting good relations with the local community.
2. Affirmative Action Officer: works for recruitment and equal opportunities for minorities; employed by business, industries, schools and government.
3. Recreation Worker: plans and supervises community recreation facilities. (Increasing number of opportunities available for therapeutic recreation workers, often requiring course work in therapeutic recreation.)
4. Urban Planning Officer: deals with city planning, renewal.
5. Personnel Administrator: works with employee relations, selection, promotions, etc.
6. Advertising copywriter: researches audience and media, writes text of advertisements.
7. Media Buyer: researches product and audiences to select most effective media for advertising.
8. Health Educator: gives public information about health and disease.
9. Vocational Rehabilitation: counsels persons with handicaps and illnesses in preparation for new vocations (some states require an M.A. degree for this position).
10. Psychiatric Technician/Assistant: administers routine tests, helps with patients under supervision of psychiatrist.
11. Director of Volunteer Service: responsible for volunteers-recruits, supervises, trains, and evaluates volunteers.
12. Public Statistician: collects and interprets data on health and disease and community relations.
13. Customs Inspector: serves at international borders and airports in investigations and inquiries.
14. Probation and Parole Officer: persons with psychology backgrounds are often preferred for such positions, especially with adolescent parolees.
15. Newspaper Reporter: social science, psychological interest areas.
16. Technical Writer: researches and writes material dealing with social science and psychological knowledge for magazines, newspapers and journals.
17. Sales Representative: major publishers of psychological books often seek out undergraduates with psychology majors for these positions on college campuses.
18. Opinion Survey Researcher: does opinion polls and interprets results.
19. Daycare Center Supervisor: supervises and coordinates activities of preschool children with working parents.
20. Research Assistant: assists in the collection and analysis of data for major investigations. Positions usually available only in large hospitals, businesses, and government.
21. Laboratory Assistant: psychology background preferred for students working with animal behavior research, especially primate laboratories.
22. Scientific Instrument Salesperson: opportunities in sales and development for companies specializing in psychology apparatus.

(To know how much each of these careers make annually simply visit www.bls.com and type in the job title)

Are you returning to school? Perhaps it’s been a year or a couple years. When you decide to return you need to renew you old network from university/college. You can also try going back and taking a few classes to meet professors. In order to go to graduate school you may need recommendation letters. Having professors that can recommend you for graduate school has value when the board of admissions is looking at your file. In your statement of intent you can address your many years away from school and why you desired to return. When writing your paper you can detail the many experiences you’ve gone through and what you have learned from them. For instance, if you took care of an elder family member you can say the experience taught you about time management. When returning to school also consider if you need to take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

How will you pay for school?

Monday, June 21st, 2010

There are a few ways to get your self through college. One is by applying for loans. These loans will pay for all your university/college expenses. The only issue with loans is that many of them have high interest levels. They will also only give you a few months to start paying once you graduate. Many people have taken this route and are slowing paying their loans with payment plans. Another option is working and going to school. This option is harder but can be done with effective time management. Expect to be studying longer than the average 4 years it takes for a bachelors. It takes two years for a masters and three more for a PH.d. If you jump from bachelors to Ph.d program it will take 5-7 years of school. The last years will be all internships and accumulating hours before your set loose to work.

A great site to use in the United States for Federal Student Aid: www.fafsa.ed.gov.

 

This site will help you fill in tax and lifestyle information which will then access if you can receive free money from the government. If you’re an independent student who does not live with parents your more likely to get federal funding as opposed to living at home. If your parents make more than 100k then you will be unable to get free money. Your school may also require you to fill in the FAFSA application. So take a look at that link.

Funding Options

Paying for school is a very expensive investment. State schools in America cost 10-15k every year while private schools can go up to 20-30k a year. Internationally school may be cheaper. Do research so you can see the exact costs! You can also try looking into your school and see if they provide funding. Some schools will pay you to study. All you need to do is fill a prerequisite such as a grade point average or enter a program specific to your area of study.

You can also take the free money route and apply for scholarships/grants. Your acceptance to these awards are dependent on the their guideline. For more information on scholarships please sign up to our email list or visit the website www.fastweb.com